Call Us On 020 8942 3148

Instagram
 

Osteopathy This Winter

Osteopathy This Winter

Written By Laurie Melrose-Doering Osteopath

The time of year has arrived in which colourful autumn leaves fill our gardens and street pavements, clocks around the UK are put back one hour, and the days give way to dark skies earlier and earlier. Although autumn has its own unique charm, many of us do not get to see the sun as much as during the summer months - be it because we cover up more of our skin in an attempt to remain warm, or because work and school hours mean it is dark by the time we envisage spending some time in the local park, which may even lead to some of us not going out to move or exercise after work or school at all.

It has long been proven that mild exercise or simply undertaking extended walks, as well as taking enough rest, reduces stress.

Autumn and approaching winter also happen to be the time of year that more of us catch colds. Is there a bit of a link? We are more predisposed to colds and infections when our immune systems are under more strain, which generally happens when we move and exercise less, see less sun that helps our body produce the vital Vitamin D, and we are more stressed. And, as previously outlined, all these exacerbating factors appear to be interrelated.

The reason movement is important for our immune system seems logical, after all, life is defined by movement. Going into further physiological detail, it becomes clear that movement is vital because it aids the circulation of lymph through the body. Lymph is an integral part of our immune system, and if movement of lymphatic fluid is not facilitated by a more active diaphragm and other natural pumps within the body, the human body quickly develops a state commonly coined congestion and stasis.

To sum matters up, see if, despite the shorter days, you can move or exercise, see as much of the sun as possible (even if it is cloudy, your body will still be able to produce Vitamin D) and try to set time aside for yourself in order to relax and destress.

This is where osteopathy could help, as it allows you to enter a, hopefully, calm environment. An osteopath may use techniques that target the diaphragm and other lymphatic pumps in the body in order to minimise the state of congestion and stasis in the body, or he/she may use cranial techniques which most patients claim have a soothing effect.

Osteopathy is a patient-centred as opposed to a condition-centred approach to health, which means no two patients are treated identically as every person’s body is unique.

 

An Intelligent Website By i.e.